• Short Summary

    Zulu leader Chief Gatsha Buthelezi has spoken out in favour of black majority rule in South Africa.

  • Description

    1.
    SV Zulu warriors chanting
    0.14

    2.
    CU Buthelezi taking part in coronation ceremony (2 shots)
    0.24

    3.
    SV Chief Buthelezi waving to crowd at airport
    0.35

    4.
    SV women in crowd waving to Buthelezi, as he walks through crowd (4 shots)
    1.00

    5.
    CU Chief Buthelezi seated for interview
    1.10

    6.
    (SAME SHOT) Buthelezi speaks.
    2.56


    "Chief Gatsha Buthelezi is one of the hereditary leaders of South Africa's four million Zulus, defeated by Britain 90 years ago. He's regarded as one of the South African Government's most outspoken opponents. The chief-here taking part in the coronation ceremony of the Zulu king has moved from supporting the government's policy of African self-governing areas Bantustans, to one of majority rule in a united South Africa. Chief Bathelezi commands widespread support, not only in the 29 Zulu tribal lands in South Africa but also among that half of the Zulu nation who live in urban areas and among other Africans. Since the success of the nationalist forces in Angola and Mozambique he's adopted a more aggressive stance towards the South African government. He maintains that Dr. Vorster's regime must recognise the hopes and aspirations of its won black population as it is prepared to do in the rest of Africa.



    "On a recent visit to London Julian Mounter asked Chief Butherlezi what pressure had the success of the Cuban and Russian backed MPLA in Angola had on his more militant followers"



    BUTHELEZI: "I think its very widespread amongst young people and I think that the MPLA in fact morally speaking is supported by most of the people in South Africa, especially when South Africa decided to take up arms on the side of the other liberation movements and South Africans, black south Africans, saw this as conflict between those who are oppressing them and forces for liberation (indistinct) the MPLA. It is quite apart from any ideological considerations."



    REPORTER: "But in practical terms how did it show itself to you, were the young people in South Africa wanting to follow the militant rising's in those countries, do they...?"



    BUTHELEZI: "I certainly feel so, in fact after my speech in South Africa as I moved among the crowd, you know, many young people normally they do after I've spoken some come and ask for autographs and some just greet me and I was talking to them and at various points I was quite amazed to find that some of them were saying to me, you go overseas quite often why don't you bring us guns. Now that sort of summarises the kind of attitude that is growing because with the Angolan situation and the Mozambique situation I think that young people and many people see the gun perhaps as the only solution to problems. Because the Frelimos as far as this feeling is concerned have solved their problems through the gun and therefore the MPLA in Angola and they see the gun as the only solution".




    Initials RH/1645 RH/AMN/AW/1706



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Zulu leader Chief Gatsha Buthelezi has spoken out in favour of black majority rule in South Africa. The chief - a hereditary leader of South African's four million Zulus defeated by Britain 90 years ago - has moved his support to majority rule from the government's policy of African self-governing areas, Bantustans.

    Chief Buthelezi has established a reputation for being on of the South African government's most outspoken opponents. He commands widespread support, not only in the 29 Zulu tribal lands in south African but also from urban Zulus and other Africans.

    The success of nationalist forces in both Angola and Mozambique have led to him taking a more aggressive stance towards the government. He maintains that Prime Minister Mr. John Vorster's regime must recognise the hopes and aspirations of its own black population as it is prepared to do in the rest of Africa.

    Until recently chief Buthelezi was seeking self-rule for his people by working within the South African government's system of apartheid -- or separate development. This was in spite of his own belief in a multi-racial community.

    Chief Buthelezi was in London recently when he told BBC reporter Julian Mounter that many black South Africans, particularly young people, were growing increasingly militant in their attitudes. He said many of them now think the only solution to their problems is the gun. He said this feeling has increased with the successes. of the Frelimos in Mozambique and the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola. (MPLA).

    This film is serviced with an English commentary by BBC reporter Donal MacCormick and an interview with Chief Bethelezi by Julian Mounter. Transcripts appear overleaf.

    SYNOPSIS: With the political situation in Southern Africa intensifying, another leader has emerged in favour of black majority rule.

    He's Chief Buthelezi, one of the leaders of South African Zulus. BBC newsman Donald MacCormick reports on his changed opinion about self rule within the apartheid system.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA3VBKKQY0IOCLMGQ3IGOQ7Q2RX
    Media URN:
    VLVA3VBKKQY0IOCLMGQ3IGOQ7Q2RX
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    29/04/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:56:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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