• Short Summary

    In Namibia, political candidates are campaigning in the run-up of the December elections called by South Africa against objections from the United Nations.

  • Description

    In Namibia, political candidates are campaigning in the run-up of the December elections called by South Africa against objections from the United Nations. The elections are part of a plan by South Africa to establish a constituent assembly in Namibia -- but the UN has proposed its own formula for the territory's independence.

    SYNOPSIS: Although Western foreign ministers who visited Namibia recently were hoping to persuade South Africa to postpone the elections, campaigning continues throughout the territory.

    Katima Mulilo, a black township in northeast Namibia, near the border with Zambia, is one place where the Democratic Turnhalle Alliance (DTA) is making a big push. The DTA, a multi-racial party, is one with a good chance of success if the elections go ahead.

    According to the London newspaper, The Times, much of the financial backing for the DTA comes from South Africa and West Germany. Their candidate in Katima Mulilo is Chief Mr. Mamili.

    Chief Mamili, speaking in the regional language of Lozi, told his audience the DTA wants an independent Namibia with a government based on tribal representation.

    But three of the major political parties in namibia have announced that they will not take part in the December elections. One of them, the South West African People's Organisation (SWAPO), has denounced the elections as a 'face-saving' device for South Africa. Despite the SWAPO boycott, polls show that it is still second in popular support.

    Whether or not Chief Mamili wins, the elections will largely go unrecognised in the West. Five Western nations which held talks with the South African government in October, said they would ignore the results. Aside from two small groups the three main parties still fighting the elections are all right-wing, according to Reuters news agency. The DTA is described as 'conservative', the Aktur party as 'right-wing' and the Reformed National Party as 'far right'.

    DTA candidates have tried-without great success -- to win the support of the Ovambo tribe, which makes up forty-six percent of the electorate, but it largely favours SWAPO.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA3QR1LQ1YJDNUKARLUMTBDEUQ0
    Media URN:
    VLVA3QR1LQ1YJDNUKARLUMTBDEUQ0
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    27/10/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:28:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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