• Short Summary

    The new sport of crab-tying attracted a large number of contestants to Darwin, Australia, willing to risk the odd pinch and cut in order to prove their skill at immobilising pincers and win a prize.

  • Description

    1.
    SV: Man tying crab with hands and bare feet.
    0.11

    2.
    GV: Crowd watch as man ties crab with voice of Richard Fon Lim (organiser) speaking over.
    0.40

    3.
    GV: Men watching man tie crab.
    0.45

    4.
    SV: Winner of competition showing art of crab tying Bill Bolstead.
    1.22


    PENFOLD:"It was indeed a first for Australia and probably the world. Crab tying as you would expect, isn't the most popular sport in the land but all the same it takes a man with a thick skin and lighting fast reflexes."



    RICHARD FON LIM:"We try to keep it as simple as possible, er, we only require the contestants to tie the two nipper claws firmly to the body, er, so that the judges don't get bitten when they pick it up."



    PENFOLD:"How about security as far as injury is concerned, are you taking any safeguards to prevent people from getting bitten.?"



    FON LIM:"Er, we have a hundred thousand dollar coverage, er, with South British Insurance."



    PENFOLD:"What does this cover you against?"



    FON LIM:"Er, loss of limb."



    PENFOLD:"Throughout the afternoon the elimination heats continued. After each, a can or two of beer, just to settle the nerves. And than to the final. By now the serious crab-tiers were left in, most had it down to a fine art, string in the teeth, one bare foot on the crab's back. The winner Bill Bolstead with a world record tie for three crabs, 32 seconds flat. His prize was a trip to Cannes, where Bill says he'll be tending to his cuts and scratches and eating anything but crab."




    Initials JS/0100


    SATELLITE TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The new sport of crab-tying attracted a large number of contestants to Darwin, Australia, willing to risk the odd pinch and cut in order to prove their skill at immobilising pincers and win a prize. Bob Penfold of TCN-9 Sydney went along to watch the inaugurating competition, and picked up some tips on the art of crab-tying from he organiser, Richard Fon Lim.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA3NAREDZYDYYN3QR1Q115VRY0S
    Media URN:
    VLVA3NAREDZYDYYN3QR1Q115VRY0S
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    09/06/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:26:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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