• Short Summary

    In Japan, the people of Nagasaki have marked the thirty-fifth anniversary of the atomic bomb dropping on their city, the devastating action that hastened the end of World War Two.

  • Description

    1.
    GV ZOOM OUT Nagasaki skyline with crosses above silhouetted grave
    0.06

    2.
    CU Elderly lady praying beside grave
    0.14

    3.
    GV Monument in Peace Park, with crowd gathered for memorial service
    0.18

    4.
    SV People laying wreaths at base of monument with others looking on (3 shots)
    0.48

    5.
    GV Peace Monument
    0.50

    6.
    GV PAN Crowd observes minute's silence (2 shots)
    1.12

    7.
    GV Birds being released (2 shots)
    1.18

    8.
    SV & CU Children in school learning about the A-Bomb (5 shots)
    1.38


    The day before the commemoration (Friday 8 August), the Japanese Prime Minister, Mr. Senko Suzuki, said in Tokyo that Japan would press for the conclusion of a comprehensive treaty banning nuclear weapons tests in the air, underwater and underground. Mr. Suzuki made this declaration during a 20-minute meeting with Mr. Philip Noel-Baker, a Briton who won the 1959 Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Noel-Baker had appealed to Japan to call on other nations to stop the nuclear arms race.





    Initials dn/



    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In Japan, the people of Nagasaki have marked the thirty-fifth anniversary of the atomic bomb dropping on their city, the devastating action that hastened the end of World War Two. Survivors and a new generation of residents on Saturday (9 August) prayed, laid wreaths on a Peace Altar, held a ban-the-bomb meeting and a torchlight procession. The bomb, dropped by the United States Air Force, killed seventy-three thousand people.

    SYNOPSIS: Nagasaki, which is shaped like an amphitheatre, in Japan's oldest open port. Its elderly citizens remember too well the horrors of August the ninth, 1945, when their world, and Japan's war hopes, literally exploded.

    More than twenty thousand people turned out for a memorial service in Peace Park, the spot where the bomb dropped. The park, situated on the Urakami River, was established in memory of the destruction the bomb had brought. The service is an annual event. This year, for the first time, Koreans who were living in the city on the dreadful day, returned to take part. It's been reported that the Japanese government has decided to begin providing compensation for Korean victims of the blast.

    The Peace monument was the focal point at two minutes past eleven in the morning, the exact moment when the bomb hit thirty-five years ago. Those who survived the devastation and those who've learned about it as modern history, offered a minute of silent prayer. It remains one of the most poignant occasions in the city's calendar.

    Another symbol of peace came with the flutter of bird-wings soaring aloft.

    A new generation is taught about the single blast which wiped out half of Nagasaki's city area. The primary target on that day had been the city of Kokura. But the American aircrew could not sight their aiming point there, and proceeded to their secondary target -- Nagasaki.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA3M2YYG3PNKAJT0SWMHI2CRJMG
    Media URN:
    VLVA3M2YYG3PNKAJT0SWMHI2CRJMG
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    10/08/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:38:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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