• Short Summary

    The African National Congress, which is banned in South Africa, on Tuesday (10 June) made public a message they said was smuggled from its jailed leader, Nelson Mandela.

  • Description

    1.
    SV Letter from imprisoned leader of the African National Congress, Nelson Mandela..
    0.10

    2.
    CU Part of his letter describing the condition of apartheid in South Africa.
    0.19

    3.
    CU Photograph of Mandela.
    0.24

    4.
    CU Francis Meli, Director of External Publicity, African Council, speaking to Visnews reporter in London. (5 SHOTS)
    1.44


    TRANSCRIPT: SEQ. 5: MELI: "In his letter, Mandela is emphasising struggle, various forms of struggle, demonstrations, schoolboy courts, mass mobilisation and also armed struggle. The National African Congress is involved in all the activities of our people - whether they be armed actions or mass mobilisation or schoolboy court of the young kids, and so forth. Therefore, Mandela has called for the intensification of struggle at all levels, including armed struggle. He is in daily contact with the activities of our people in our movement. In a sense, he is with the people. Although he is isolated and so forth, he has the communication. The people are involved in the struggle all over the country - rural and urban population. In fact, the struggle is going to intensify as the years go by, and, of course, Mandela's work is always an inspiration to our people both young and old, those who know him personally, and those who have never seen him. They look at him as a symbol of African resistance."





    Initials





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The African National Congress, which is banned in South Africa, on Tuesday (10 June) made public a message they said was smuggled from its jailed leader, Nelson Mandela. In the letter, Mr. Mandela, who is serving a life sentence, called for unity among all blacks to end apartheid in South Africa.

    SYNOPSIS: The congress claimed the letter took two years to reach its headquarters in Lusaka from Mr. Mandela's prison on South Africa's Robben Island.

    In part of the letter, he describes the South African Government as "race-mad rulers" who "rule with the gun and the hangman." Mr. Francis Meli, Director of External Publicity for the African Council, said in London the letter called on black South Africans to intensify their struggle against apartheid.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA3IU3HUSSQ26C2IV53J2Q42SF6
    Media URN:
    VLVA3IU3HUSSQ26C2IV53J2Q42SF6
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    10/06/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:44:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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