• Short Summary

    Forty-thousand Primary School children in the Ivory Coast began classes for the first time this week (Monday, September 25), and in doing so proved the success of the country's educational television policy.

  • Description

    Forty-thousand Primary School children in the Ivory Coast began classes for the first time this week (Monday, September 25), and in doing so proved the success of the country's educational television policy.

    The policy was cautiously introduced in the last school year when 20-thousand pupils in 447 classes were closely watched, and their teachers consulted, to see if the venture was worthwhile. The Government hoped that televised lessons would make it possible to reduce primary schooling from six to four years, and make primary schooling available throughout the country by 1980.

    The Secretary of State responsible for the programme, Mr. Pascal Dikebie, says results of the experiment are very comforting. Teachers found the television screen an ally-not, as some feared, a rival. And the children--who programmes and made better progress than pupils starting with traditional methods.

    979 new classes opened under the programme this week, with 40-thousand pupils, bringing the Ivory Coast's total of Primary School "television class" pupils to 60-thousand.

    SYNOPSIS: For half-a-million Primary School children in the Ivory Coast, Monday was the start of a new school year. And for forty-thousand of these it was a specially novel experience. Besides the usual excitement and shyness of the first day at school these children would be seeing television--for the first time in their young lives.

    It's the start of the second year of the Ivory Coast's Educational Television programme. The scheme is devised to shorten the primary school course, and make primary education available across the country.

    When the project was started last year there were fears that the children would not be able to learn from the screen. But the results reported show that television programmes stimulate the children's interest.

    Some teachers, too, feared that the screen would become a rival and they would lose their authority in the classroom. But experience has taught them it can be a powerful help.

    The Government believes Educational Television can cut two years off the present six-year Primary School course, and by 1980 bring Primary Schooling within the reach of all the country's children.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA39S5S5NST7K9GJ18RPKPIXEGM
    Media URN:
    VLVA39S5S5NST7K9GJ18RPKPIXEGM
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    29/09/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:31:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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