• Short Summary

    While much of the news coming out of Ethiopia is at present concerned with the country's internal political upheavals, international aid to areas gripped by one of the world's worst famines continues to increase.

  • Description

    While much of the news coming out of Ethiopia is at present concerned with the country's internal political upheavals, international aid to areas gripped by one of the world's worst famines continues to increase.

    At the beginning of April, three Ethiopian parliamentarians told newsmen that over a quarter-of-a-million people died in the northern Wallo Province last year because of the famine. Although much of the international aid is specifically for famile relief -- foodstuffs, powdered milk and vital agricultural supplies -- part of it is medical aid.

    For example, most of the United States Peace Corps workers in Ethiopia are engaged in public health projects, Over two hundred volunteers from the United States are working in communities giving instruction in public health and training local doctors to take their places when they return home. The British Disasters emergency Committee, which co-ordinates aid coming from the United Kingdom, has reported that over one-and-a-half-million Ethiopians will need food and medical assistance in 1974 -- one-third of them children under the age of ni???
    There are only 400 permanent doctors in Ethiopian, and all but 30 reside in the capital, Addis Ababa. To help meet this imbalance, one international charity, Oxfam, is to send a mobile health unit to work in rural areas, supported by a five-man medical team.

    Some have expressed fears that this year will bring further famine and drought. The thirteen relief centres along the road from Addis Ababa to Asmara which were virtually empty in January, after being crowded at the peak of the famine, have begun to fill up again. Many of the refugees have begun to regard the centres as "home". Medical care is limited, even though the remaining 16 doctors eight health officers, 16 nurses and 33 dressers are working around the clock.

    However, a recent government White Paper should have a significant impact on the future. One of the major factors contributing to the food shortages lay in the relationship between the peasant-farmers and their absentee landlords. Now the Ethiopian government has promised to give the farmers the chance to own their own land and break-up the near-feudal tenancies, reforming the agricultural way-of-life.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA39IODD5YJ5AOYTHRFO4CVK7B1
    Media URN:
    VLVA39IODD5YJ5AOYTHRFO4CVK7B1
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    12/04/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:14:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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