• Short Summary

    As Mayor of New York's turbulent multi-racial, eight-million population, John Vliet Lindsay is currently reckoned to hold the second toughest job in the United States.

  • Description


    9667/69


    1.
    GV Lindsay through crowd, giving victory sign (2 shots)
    0.08

    2.
    GV Flags
    0.11

    3.
    CU Crowd with placards "Deport Lindsay" and "Lindsay Goodbye" (2 shots)
    0.18


    4666/70


    4.
    SV PAN UP..effigy of Lindsay hung from lamp-post
    0.27


    2598/67


    5.
    GV Band parading
    0.32

    6.
    SV Lindsay past waving
    0.36

    7.
    SV Robert Kennedy waving
    0.40


    63/66 B/W T/R DEC 1965


    8.
    TGV Traffic congestion
    0.44

    9.
    GV Lindsay and officials out of building
    0.51

    10.
    SV & BV Lindsay tours streets (2 shots)
    0.58

    11.
    LV PAN..Crowd waiting on railway platform
    1.04


    7136/66 B/W T/R


    12.
    CU Anti-Negro demonstration past
    1.09

    13.
    SV Negro children in street
    1.12

    14.
    LV ZOOM IN..Lindsay amongst crowd
    1.15

    15.
    GV Crowd applauding
    1.22

    16.
    SV Lindsay speaking ZOOM OUT TO LV..DITTO
    1.52


    11010/67


    17.
    GV Crowd applaud
    1.55

    18.
    SV Lindsay with Hussein and woman
    1.58

    19.
    CU Lindsay PAN TO CU..Hussein
    2.08


    7200/69


    20.
    GV Astronauts motorcade through tickertape
    2.10

    21.
    SV Astronauts waving from car
    2.16

    22.
    TGV Crowd
    2.19

    23.
    SV Lindsay presents medal to Armstrong
    2.34


    1428/69


    24.
    GV Lindsay touring snowbound streets in car
    2.39

    25.
    SV Crowd
    2.40

    26.
    GV PAN..Lindsay past jeering crowd
    2.48

    27.
    GV Crowd round Lindsay on rostrum
    2.53


    9750/69 T/R


    28.
    SV Lindsay speaking
    3.12


    TRANSCRIPT: SEQ. 28: Lindsay: "It's a victory for the Republicans, who held fast to the tradition of progressive Republicans and who stood by me after the primary. (Applause). It's victory for the Democrats, who put principle above party, and who supported me (Applause)."



    SEQ. 16: Lindsay: "This morning, I represented this city at a parade that was held to show that New Yorkers are aware of the sacrifice that American troops are being called on to make in the Vietnam war. And I'm here this afternoon to reaffirm my opposition to the conduct of the war and to join with you in going for a swift, just settlement to solve this unwanted conflict."




    Initials AH/ML/BJ/1225 AH/ML/ES.13.35



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: As Mayor of New York's turbulent multi-racial, eight-million population, John Vliet Lindsay is currently reckoned to hold the second toughest job in the United States. Rumour has is that in two years time he will be contesting the toughest job of all, the Presidency. Political observers regard Lindsay as one of the front-runners in the race to the White House, though he has frequently denied presidential ambitions.

    His re-election last year for a second term of office as mayor was a personal triumph. Standing as a Liberal Independent, Lindsay fought a brilliant campaign against the party machines of the Democrats and the Republicans. Even steadfast party members deserted their normal loyalties because they admired the integrity and liberal principles shown during Lindsay's first period of office.

    As a result of his famous victory last year, Lindsay currently stands at the political crossroads of his career. If he does run for President, he must either seek reconciliation with the Republicans - the party that backed his first term of office - or switch allegiance to the Democrats, who already regard Lindsay with favour.

    This is how Lindsay summed his vote-splitting victory last year:
    Forty-eight-year-old Lindsay is unlike any other mayor in New York's history. On the surface, he epitomises the WASP (White Anglo-Saxon Protestant). His background is pure establishment. He's the son of a banker, educated at private schools and Yale University, who practised law before entering politics.

    After serving as Republican Congressman for an upper-middle class area of Manhattan, Lindsay first ran as mayor in 1965. Predictably, he achieved victory due to strong upper-and middle-class backing.

    But his outspoken statements on the Vietnam war soon lost him many of his original supporters:
    The policies he pursued during his first four years of office also caused a reversal in the voting pattern when Lindsay stood fro re-election last year. He lost the Republican nomination and the majority of middle-class backing. This time he gathered most of his votes from the very rich and the very poor - from the Negroes, the Puerto Ricans, and the WASPs.

    This change in voting pattern was largely the result of Lindsay's concern with the impoverished, coupled with his attempt to run the city honourably after 20 years of government based on cynical bargaining. He was soon in conflict with the unions.

    He had just been sworn into office when the city was paralysed by a 12-day strike of transport workers. Equally crippling were the subsequent strikes by refuse collectors and schoolteachers. As a result of the disputes, Lindsay lost much of his middle-class support.

    In his anxiety to avoid the race riots that tore Harlem apart prior to his arrival at City Hall, Lindsay showed sympathy towards the Negroes. At time of heightened racial tension, he has a habit of going to the storm-centre, reassuring people, calming them and generally taking the heat out of the situation.

    It's a policy that has paid dividends. During five years in which major American cities have plunged into racial violence and rioting, New York - with potentially the worst problem - has escaped the worst of the violence.

    But Lindsay is no miracle worker. The social problems spawned by a city of New York's size are staggering in number of variety. Pollution, traffic chaos, drug addiction, crime, and unemployment -New York is afflicted by all of these.

    And Lindsay is there as a universal scapegoat to take the blame when any problem bursts into the open. He was the culprit when 14 inches of snow fell on Hew York one Sunday last year. Though the weather bureau hadn't forecast the blizzard, Lindsay was faulted for not anticipating the situation.

    Most of the social problems facing any large American city simply cannot be solved effectively at local level. Action by the Federal Government is required if such problems are to be remedied. So what Lindsay can do little to solve from City Hall, he might achieve from the White House. It's this kind of speculation that encourages the Democrats, in particular, to make overtures to New York's unconventional mayor as the next Presidential election approaches.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA39EDGCOHLVQ3XGT40QQTAEG4S
    Media URN:
    VLVA39EDGCOHLVQ3XGT40QQTAEG4S
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    02/11/1970
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:03:15:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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