• Short Summary

    Scientists have flown half a dozen fragments of the Soviet Satellite that crashed in Canada's northwestern territories to be examined at the Atomic Energy Control Board laboratories at Yellowknife.

  • Description

    1.
    GV: helicopter on snowy ground, figures nearby.
    0.06

    2.
    GV ZOOM INTO CU: wrecked cylinder surrounded by scientists (3 shots)
    0.16

    3.
    SV: man carries cylinder into helicopter.
    0.22

    4.
    GV: (NIGHT) helicopter taking off, PAN TO RCMP vehicle.
    0.32

    5.
    SV EXTERIOR: scientists gathered around satellite fragments on ground.
    0.37

    6.
    SV INTERIOR: news conference, Pressmen surrounding Atomic Control Board Scientist, Geoff Knight.
    0.42

    7.
    SV: Knight speaking
    0.58

    8.
    SV: camera crew at conference.
    1.04

    9.
    SCU: Lieutenant Colonel Alec Bialosh speaking.
    1.17

    10.
    SV: helicopter flies over Great Slave Lake searching.
    1.22

    11.
    GV: partially snow-covered debris on ground near Warden's Grove. (2 shots)
    1.39


    REPORTER: "The debris was recovered on Great Slave Lake, 300 kilometres east of Yellowknife. This cylinder though not radioactive, will intrigue scientists. It's made of three metals, and could tell them more about Soviet satellite construction. Armed Forces film did not record the second fragment, picked up nearby. But, on return to Yellowknife lat night, it was radioactive. The recovery team members went through a lengthy contamination check on the tarmac. Results were negative. Later, reporters were told the radioactivity of the fragment was high but hazardous only with a prolonged direct exposure."



    KNIGHT: "I have been working on this the last couple of days and have perhaps come as close as anyone to it, and the sort of exposure I've received is, you know, no less than one or two X-ray exposures that people receive here for chest X-ray."



    REPORTER: "The ground team commander was asked how much longer his men would continue this slow, frigid search.



    BIALOSH: "We owe it to mankind, we owe it to the inhabitants of the immediate area, and we owe it to ourselves to ensure that we do everything we can to discover all the pieces that are strewn about there."



    REPORTER: "Next to be recovered is another piece of debris on Great Slave Lake. Removal of the larger wreckage 300 kilometres further east near Warden's Grove will require heavy equipment to cut through surrounding ice. That operation is scheduled to begin with an airdrop later this week. Arthur Kent, CBC News, Yellowknife."




    Initials RH/2330


    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Scientists have flown half a dozen fragments of the Soviet Satellite that crashed in Canada's northwestern territories to be examined at the Atomic Energy Control Board laboratories at Yellowknife. One of two pieces located in snowy tundra at Great Slave Lake on Tuesday (31 January) was found to be radioactive. Arthur Kent of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reports.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA3687SM8HDRDTDKVPKXA7IC4TP
    Media URN:
    VLVA3687SM8HDRDTDKVPKXA7IC4TP
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    02/02/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:39:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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