• Short Summary

    DEGHABUR, ADDIS ABABA, KELAFO AND HARRAWA, ETHIOPIA

    Several million Ethiopians could die as a result of the two-year drought in the country which has now reached unprecedented levels, a senior government official warned in May.

  • Description

    DEGHABUR:
    1. SVs PAN Remains of dead goats and cattle (3 shots) 0.25
    2. SVs Carcass of dead camel (2 shots) 0.35
    3. SV Remains of dead cows 0.38
    ADDIS ABABA AIRPORT:
    4. CU Dawit Gorgise, Chairman of Relief and Rehabilitation Commission, speaks (SOT) 1.38
    KELAFO NEAR SOMALI BORDER:
    5. SVs & GV Villagers with herd of goats and cattle moving over dusty land (3 shots) 1.58
    6. GV PAN Village huts 2.10
    7. CU ZOOM OUT Woman and child outside hut 2.20
    8. SVs Children seated with water container and old woman with child (2 shots) 2.32
    9. GVs Maize field with farmers hoeing dry ground (3 shots) 2.45
    10. CU ZOOM OUT Man praying for rain 2.53
    11. SVs Cattle with ribs visible grazing on parched grass (2 shots) 2.59
    HARRAWA:
    12. GV AND CUs Train arrives from Djibouti carrying water; water containers on train (3 shots) 3.23
    13. GV Derailed water containers -- result of guerrilla attack 3.27
    14. SVs Armed soldiers on train and alongside train (3 shots) 3.37
    15. GV Dust blowing across parched land 3.45
    SPEECH TRANSCRIPT (SEQ. 4):
    REPORTER: "Commissioner, you say that the drought has now become unmanageable for you. What exactly do you mean by that?"
    COMMISSIONER DAWIT GORGISE: "When we say unmanageable, we are saying that right now, there are 5.2 million Ethiopians who have been directly affected by the drought, and we feel that it is a very severe, the most sever drought we had in the last 23 years. And we feel that unless we get a substantial amount of assistance in the coming two months that there will be a catastrophe in the country. Already there are quite a substantial number of people who have moved from their villages who have sold their cattle. They have abandoned their homes and their land and have come to (indistinct) or city centres. And the fact that we have to maintain the lives of these people and eventually find some sort of settlement scheme for the rehabilitation of these people has made the overall situation very complicated and very unmanageable."
    InitialsCC/BB


    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: DEGHABUR, ADDIS ABABA, KELAFO AND HARRAWA, ETHIOPIA

    Several million Ethiopians could die as a result of the two-year drought in the country which has now reached unprecedented levels, a senior government official warned in May. The Chairman of the Relief and Rehabilitation Commission, Mr Dawit Gorgise, said that his country faced a catastrophe if substantial aid did not reach it by July. Livestock was dying by the thousands due to lack of grazing pastures and water. He added that villagers were fleeing drought-stricken areas and flocking into camps, leaving their only means of livelihood behind. This meant that the government had to provide for them. Dawit said that the situation was becoming unmanageable. Political upheavals on Ethiopia's borders have compounded the problems facing the administration with the arrival of refugees and the repatriation from neighbouring Djibouti of Ethiopian refugees. The Ethiopian government recently claimed that up to 300,000 Somali nationals had sought refuge from what they described as "government persecution" in their own country. Some of these had settled at Kelafo where they also had to struggle against the effects of drought. Djibouti has sent water in by train to Harrawa. Armed guards are posted to protect this precious cargo from guerrilla attacks. The trains also carry repatriated Ethiopian refugees who the government must place in settlements. The situation in Ethiopia is mirrored across the African continent. Earlier this year, experts gathered in the Ethiopians capital to discuss the famine. They estimated that it had affected 34 countries in the Sahel region -- which stretches from Sudan and the Horn of Africa to the West Coast -- as well as areas of Eastern and Southern Africa. A spokesman for the Addis Ababa conference said that the drought had exacerbated an already bad food situation on the continent. He warned that if it persisted, Africa might become a vast desert. The officials annealed to the international community for urgent aid, saying that 1.3 million tonnes (tons) would be needed to save 150 million Africans from starvation. According to Dawit, Ethiopia alone required 250,000 tonnes (tons) for drought victims to receive the minimum daily grain ration.

    Source: REUTERS - MOHAMMED AMIN

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA367SGB5HSO304NFXEGG8H5JHA
    Media URN:
    VLVA367SGB5HSO304NFXEGG8H5JHA
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    17/05/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:46:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment