• Short Summary

    Europe's first observatory satellite, the COS-B, designed to study extraterrestrial gamma radiation, was launched from the Vandeberg Air Force Base in California, U.

  • Description

    1.
    CU Delta 2913 rocket at launch pad
    0.05

    2.
    CU Engineer
    0.08

    3.
    CU & MVs Rocket (2 shots)
    0.21

    4.
    MV Control room showing technicians and monitors (5 shots)
    0.35

    5.
    GV Rocket
    0.40

    6.
    MV Technicians and control panels (4 shots)
    0.56

    7.
    GV Rocket blasts off (2 shots)
    1.20



    Initials CL/1602 CL/1616



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Europe's first observatory satellite, the COS-B, designed to study extraterrestrial gamma radiation, was launched from the Vandeberg Air Force Base in California, U.S.A. on Friday (8 August).

    NASA's Goodard Space Flight Centre handled the launching. A Delta 2913 three stage rocket took the satellite up and will place it in orbit on a 90 degree inclination from the equator.

    The 612 pound (275 kilogram) satellite has two main objectives: to establish the intensity of the average gamma ray flux and to search for time variations, both long term as observed in certain x-ray sources, and for very short periods, characteristic of pulsars now observed in visible, x-ray and radio wavelengths.

    The European Space Agency (ESA) ground stations in Belgium, Alaska and West Germany will be the prime sites for early orbit, and will take over control of the mission from NASA as soon as the satellite is in its highly elliptical orbit. The mission is a joint Italian, West Germany, French and Dutch project.

    Extraterrestrial gamma radiation provides knowledge of high energy processes in space. The pulsars are believed to be composed of highly compressed nuclear matter and emanate periodic radio emissions and super energetic cosmic rays.

    SYNOPSIS: The Delta two-nine-one-three, three stage rocket on the launch pad at California's Vandenberg Air Force Base. The rocket is loaded with Europe's first observatory satellite, designed to study extraterrestrial gamma radiation. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Centre handled the launching. The space administration body had responsibility for the operation until the satellite was placed into its highly elliptical orbit on an inclination of ninety degrees from the equator.

    The European Space Agency (ESA) takes control and will use its ground stations in Belgium, Alaska and West Germany during the early orbit. The satellite mission has two main objectives: to establish the intensity of gamma ray flux and to search for time variations, both long term as observed in certain x-ray sources, and for very short periods, characteristic of pulsars now observed in visible, x-ray and radio wavelengths. Extraterrestrial gamma rays provide knowledge of high energy process in space. The pulsars are believed to be composed of highly compressed nuclear matter and emanate periodic radio emissions and super energetic cosmic rays.

    The satellite will gain most of its information from stars. The blast-off itself went off without a hitch, and at this stage everything is reported to be "looking good"

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA34I64HOXV1QIRM92RNX5L57MV
    Media URN:
    VLVA34I64HOXV1QIRM92RNX5L57MV
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    11/08/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:20:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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