• Short Summary

    In Zimbabwe, Prime Minister Robert Mugabe assured a rally of six thousand people in the troubled Mtoko area on Saturday (13 September) that the government was working as quickly as possible to rectify injustices practised by the country's former white administration.

  • Description

    1.
    GV PAN ACROSS Crowd with armed guerrilla standing guard
    0.10

    2.
    GV Guerrillas on guard PAN FROM Head TO Gun PAN UP TO Guerrilla's head (3 shots)
    0.26

    3.
    GV Tribal dancing with Prime Minister Robert Mugabe watching (2 shots)
    0.35

    4.
    SV PULL OUT FROM Pro-Mugabe hat to crowd
    0.42

    5.
    GV Armed civilian with guerrilla controlling crowd (3 shots)
    0.56

    6.
    CU Mugabe addressing crowd PAN FROM Guerrilla TV SV Crowd listening GV Mugabe PAN TO Crowd (4 shots)
    1.30




    Initials AM/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In Zimbabwe, Prime Minister Robert Mugabe assured a rally of six thousand people in the troubled Mtoko area on Saturday (13 September) that the government was working as quickly as possible to rectify injustices practised by the country's former white administration. Many of those attending the rally were former nationalist guerrillas who have now become the governments biggest problem. The former bush fighters have been cooped up in spartan camps for more than eight months now and many have begun to wonders what benefits they can expect from their struggle for the country's independence.

    SYNOPSIS: Armed guerrillas kept watch over the crowd. The recent weeks boredom, resentment and indiscipline among the former bush fighters has spilled over into violence. The worst problem has been at Camp X-ray on the outskirts of the tiny farming settlement of Mtoko, 100 miles (160 kms) east of Salisbury. There, one thousand guerrillas who belonged to Mugabe's Zimbabwe African National Liberation Army (ZANLA) have virtually taken over the town and police have withdrawn to their fortified compound.

    Prime Minister Mugabe's visit to Mtoko and Camp X-Ray on Saturday (13 September) was an attempt to boost the fighters' morale. Plans to integrate the troops into a single army have been hampered by lack of accommodation, standard uniforms and weapons, not to mention tribal differences, and many of the guerrillas feel bitter at what they see as an ignominious end to the war.

    But the Prime Minister made it clear to the crowd that he would not tolerate troublemakers of any kind. He told them : if there are any policemen who cause trouble, my government says -- down with them; but if you are arrested for stealing, then we say down with you.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA321INT9L05Q4VMRHBFYVX7OMW
    Media URN:
    VLVA321INT9L05Q4VMRHBFYVX7OMW
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    15/09/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:31:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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