• Short Summary

    Thousand of Belfast Protestants lined the city's streets on Saturday (2 October) for the funeral processions of Alexander Andrews and Ernest Bates, the two men killed when a bomb destroyed a pub in the city earlier during the week.

  • Description

    1.
    MS Coffin and mourners past camera.
    0.13

    2.
    MS Crowds watch
    0.22

    3.
    GV Funeral procession with coffin
    0.27

    4.
    MS Onlookers
    0.37

    5.
    MS Hearse followed by mourners
    0.42

    6.
    MS Coffin bearing body of Alexander Andrews carried past his home in Derry Street
    0.54

    7.
    MS Lorry loaded with Wreaths
    1.01

    8.
    SCU Woman weeps by side of coffin
    1.15

    9.
    Coffin carried by four Orangemen to end of Derry St.
    1.26

    10.
    GTV Funeral cortege
    1.33

    11.
    MS Hearses followed by long procession
    1.44

    12.
    LS Hearse passes troops on guard in foreground
    1.49

    13.
    TV Hearses followed by mourners
    2.03

    14.
    GTV Cortege and onlookers
    2.06

    15.
    MS Hearses with mourners
    2.14

    16.
    STV Hearses with cartage past crowds
    2.21

    17.
    LV Troops find bomb
    2.27

    18.
    GV Deserted street
    2.32

    19.
    LV Bomb exploded in street and SV (2 shots)
    2.34

    20.
    LV Soldiers take cover as second bomb is exploded bomb is exploded (2 shots)
    2.50


    TRANSCRIPT: REPORTER: "It was a day of silent ceremony in the Shankhill Road. And mourners came not just from that neighbourhood, but from all the Protestant areas of Belfast. For this was more than just another funeral. It was an expression of sorrow and of solidarity by the city's Protestant community. There was a huge turnout, and Police estimates put the total number in the funeral procession at about fifteen thousand, but there were more than twice as many watching them pass by. The onlookers were mostly women. They stood not just in the Shankhill road, but in other roads leading off it. For initially, there was not one procession, there were two, and each went its different way. The body of Alexander Andrews was carried from the Orange Hall, where it had been lying overnight, and taken past his home in Derry Street, near the Shankhill Road. Behind there came the tributes. There were more than a hundred wreaths, so many that a lorry was needed to hold them. It was a time of public mourning and of private grief. The dead man was sixty years old, and married, with eight children. He was also an Orangemen, and many of the mourners wore the sashes of the Orange Order as they marched behind the coffin. The procession passed out of the side streets and back into the Shankhill Road, where it converged with the procession of mourners for Ernest Bates, the other man killed in the explosion. The crowd was entirely orderly. The funeral passed without incident, and the Army, who watched it pass, had nothing to do. The whole procedure was in some ways a sadly familiar one here. For several months past, there have been other funerals for other victims of the continuing civil disorder. But none of them on such a scale as this."



    The five bombs found this evening int he centre of Belfast were too dangerous to handle. So the Army is blowing them up on the spot. Although sandbags were placed around the bombs, damage to property was inevitable."




    Initials BB/0322 RR/PN/BB/0335


    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Thousand of Belfast Protestants lined the city's streets on Saturday (2 October) for the funeral processions of Alexander Andrews and Ernest Bates, the two men killed when a bomb destroyed a pub in the city earlier during the week. The funerals presented an expression of sorrow and solidarity by the city's protestant community, and police estimates put the total number in the procession at fifteen thousand. Twice this figure crowded the streets to watch them pass by. But the crowds were orderly, and there were no incidents.

    Later in the afternoon, however, five bombs were discovered planted in the city centre. They were fitted with sensitive anti-handling devices, so the Army decided to detonate them on the spot, with the inevitable damage to property.

    This telerecording from BBC Television News carries the full commentary of the reporter describing the day's events. The transcript of his commentary accompanies.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA30EVO8MEOVIBCNTO9PQWZ7JD9
    Media URN:
    VLVA30EVO8MEOVIBCNTO9PQWZ7JD9
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    02/10/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:50:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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