• Short Summary

    Anti-fascist demonstrators marched through Rome on Tuesday (7 October) to condemn last Friday's (3 October) bomb attack on a Jewish synagogue in Paris.

  • Description

    1.
    SV Demonstrators marching and carrying banners in Rome. (4 SHOTS)
    1.14

    2.
    SV Carabinieri looking on.
    1.15

    3.
    SV Demonstrators outside French embassy, chanting. (2 SHOTS)
    1.41




    Initials JS/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Anti-fascist demonstrators marched through Rome on Tuesday (7 October) to condemn last Friday's (3 October) bomb attack on a Jewish synagogue in Paris. Four people died and nine were seriously injured in the explosion which has been blamed on a neo-Nazi group. The attack has brought harsh criticism against the French government from France's three-quarters-of-a-million strong Jewish community. They claim the government has done little to combat right-wing violence. Their criticisms were echoed in Rome, where the population has witnessed numerous instances of neo-Nazi violence in recent times.

    SYNOPSIS: Italian police estimate a crowd of about five-thousand people demonstrated against the bombing of the Paris synagogue. Their march coincided with a march of about 220-thousand in Paris itself. French President Valery Giscard d'Estaing, spoke on television about the bombing to quell French outrage against the incident. He denied there was a resurgence of fascism in France, and vowed that the French police would do everything legally possible to track down the perpetrators of the bombing. As with the Paris demonstration, protesters in Rome carried banners attacking the French government. They backed a call for the resignation of French Interior Minister, Christian Bonnet, and chanted accusations claiming Mr. Bonnet and the President were "accomplices to murder".

    The mainly Jewish demonstrators took their protest to the French embassy in Rome echoing indignation in France that President Giscard d'Estaing's government has neglected the growth of neo-Nazi groups.

    As police looked on from the side streets anti-fascist marchers let it be known that they sympathised with their counterparts in Paris. The experience of the recent Bologna train station blast, also thought to be the work of extreme right-wingers, have fortified Italian public opinion against the resurgence of fascist movements in Europe.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2XNXFD5FCM32KZDI8W3KK3I2Z
    Media URN:
    VLVA2XNXFD5FCM32KZDI8W3KK3I2Z
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/10/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:40:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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