• Short Summary

    Parts of the wreckage of the Air Libya Boeing 727 were still Smouldering on Thursday when newsmen visited the scene, more than 24 hours after it had crashed in the desert of Sinai.

  • Description

    Parts of the wreckage of the Air Libya Boeing 727 were still Smouldering on Thursday when newsmen visited the scene, more than 24 hours after it had crashed in the desert of Sinai.

    One hundred and six people died after four Israeli fighters shot down a passenger plane over Israeli-occupied Sinai. Twisted and jagged wreckage, only some if it burnt, was scattered over half a mile (one km) a little north of the Great Bitter Lake about 12 miles (20 kms) from the Suez Canal. The tail of the plane, a damaged wheel and some engine parts lay about 400 metres (yards) from the main wreckage. Clothes, personal papers and luggage were scattered about.

    The few survivors were taken to the Government Hospital at Beersheba. One of them, the plane's steward, Frenchman, Jean-Pierre Burdiat, who has a broken leg said, "Our compass was out of order. There was a bed sandstorm. The plane had made a forced landing but crashed."
    The French Ambassador to Israel, Francis Hure and his wife, visited the injured steward.

    SYNOPSIS: The twisted and jagged wreckage of the Air Libya Boeing 727 in which more than one hundred people died when it crashed in the desert of Sinal on Wednesday. The passenger plans was intercepted by israeli fighters near the Suez Canal. Parta of the wreckage amouldered more than twenty four hours later.

    The wreckage is scattered over half a mile on flat, sandy ground hear a sand dune. The tailplane, a damaged wheel and some engine parts were lying about four hundred years away from the bulk of the blackened cockpit and engine wreckage. Rescue teams, which arrived at the scene in tanks and half-tracks, took eighteen hours to extricate, the bodies.

    With the metal wreckage are piles of personal belongings, clothes, papers, luggage -- and indications are that women and children were on board. A rubber dingy and life-jackets lie useless near a smashed child's bicycle. A visiting card of the plane's captain, Jacques Bourges was found in the sand.

    At the Government Hospital at Beersheba where survivors were taken, the plane's steward, Frenchman Jena-Pierre Burdiat - the first survivor shown - was well enough to speak to newsmen. Another survivor is an Egyptian. Mr. Burdiat said the plane's compass was out of order, and the pilot had tried to make a forced landing but crashed.

    The French Ambassador to Israel, Francis Hure and his wife, visited the injured steward in hospital on Thursday. The ambassador said afterwards he had received no particular instruction from him Government. Doctors told him that M. Burdiat had a good change of surviving. Representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross saw the injured and were able to speak with two other survivors.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2T00U19ERYALE6W3NT0KGUCK8
    Media URN:
    VLVA2T00U19ERYALE6W3NT0KGUCK8
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    22/02/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:58:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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