• Short Summary

    Angry demonstrators surrounded the British High Commission in Lusaka for the second day running of Friday (23 November) as anti-British feeling mounted.

  • Description

    Angry demonstrators surrounded the British High Commission in Lusaka for the second day running of Friday (23 November) as anti-British feeling mounted. President Kenneth Kaunda told a press conference earlier in the week that he held Britain responsible for Zimbabwe Rhodesian raids into Zambia over the last year. He said Britain was using the raids to force Zambia to pressure the patriotic Front into further concessions at the ceasefire negotiations in London.

    SYNOPSIS: One of the most recent Zimbabwe Rhodesian raids was at this bridge at Chongwe -- about twenty-five miles east of The Zambian capital. Six helicopters from over the borders are reported to have staged the attack. Zambia claims it was just one in a series of raids designed to paralyse the country's economy by destroying important transportation links.

    It was this attack that prompted President Kenneth Kaunda to put the country on full alert and to call up all reservists.

    On Friday (23 November) students gathered outside the British High Commission in Lusaka for the second day running in an expression of solidarity with President Kenneth Kaunda's decision to put the country on a war footing.

    More than two thousand demonstrators surrounded the Commission, demolished part of a boundary wall and broke windows as anti-British feelings took on a new note of aggression. The students were demanding the withdrawal of British High Commissioner Sir Leonard Allinson -- but later in the day the British government announced his recall for what they called urgent consultations.

    On Thursday (22 November) demonstrators had lowered the flag at the Commission in a show of hostility to Zambian's former colonial masters.

    And as happened the day before the demonstration moved onto State House where the protestors presented a petition backing up their demand for Sir Allison's withdrawal. President Kaunda said the students were showing "fantastic" spirit. The sudden deterioration of relations between Zambia and Britain -- which follows popular visits both by Queen Elizabeth and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher this year -- comes after a wave of Zimbabwe Rhodesian attacks on key Zambian economic targets. The attacks are in contrast to previous strikes aimed mainly at Patriotic Front installations in the country.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2PNDMS9CU11VD9UNQU4XES81Y
    Media URN:
    VLVA2PNDMS9CU11VD9UNQU4XES81Y
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    24/11/1979
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:58:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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