• Short Summary

    Tanks rolled through the streets of Athens on Sunday (25 November) in an apparently bloodless coup overthrowing the government of President George papadopoulos, who came to power in 1967 in a similar manner.

  • Description

    Tanks rolled through the streets of Athens on Sunday (25 November) in an apparently bloodless coup overthrowing the government of President George papadopoulos, who came to power in 1967 in a similar manner.

    President Papadopoulos was deposed and replaced by General Phaedon Gizikis, Commander of the First Army, with the proclaimed aim of saving the country from chaos and avoiding "an electoral adventure".

    The three armed services acted just a week after the Army was called out to quell student and worker riots in Athens, in which at least 12 people were killed. The protests were the most serious recent signs of internal opposition to the Papadopoulos regime.

    The coup began at 0400 hours local time (0200 GMT) when tanks and armoured troop carriers rolled into the centre of Athens from the outskirts and took up positions outside all the key ministries. They also surrounded radio stations and the telecommunications organisation.

    Steel-helmeted troops blocked the roads and halted traffic in Athena and Saloniks, Greece's second city, Telecommunications both inside the country and with the outside world were cut. The new government announced a curfew which was later lifted, but the two cities remained virtually deserted. When people tried to go out onto the streets in the morning, they were immediately turned back.

    In a clear move to show solidarity, Athens streets were patrolled by heavily-armed squads of army, navy and airforce troops. Two fighter squadrons also flew over the city.

    All Greek troops on leave were ordered t return to their barracks.

    The country's new leaders said in a statement that they had decided to move in to "save the country from the danger and chaos facing it." Tanks and troops guarded the house of Mr. Papadopoulos, and reporters were not allowed near the area.

    SYNOPSIS: Heavily-armed troops took up posts around government buildings in Athens on Sunday morning in an apparently bloodless coup overthrowing the regime of President George Papadopoulos -- who came to power in 1967 in a similar fashion.

    President Papadopoulos was deposed and replaced by General Phaedon Gizikis, Commander of the Greek First Army, who has said his aim was "to save the country from chaos and to avoid an electoral adventure."
    The three armed services acted a week after the Army was called out to quell student and worker demonstrations in Athens, in which at least twelve people were killed.

    By mid-Sunday morning, tanks and armoured troop carriers had taken up positions outside all the key ministries. They also surrounded radio stations and the telecommunications headquarters. A curfew was announced and later lifted, but the streets remained virtually deserted.

    The country's new leaders said in a statement they had decided to move in to "save the country from the danger and chaos facing it." They said Greece had deflected from the objectives of the 1967 revolution.

    Outside the old Palace, the government headquarters overlooking Constitution Square, a journalist was arrested for taking pictures within the building. The Old Palace was the setting of General Gizikis's swearing-in ceremony shown on television.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2IRQK6PU8P315GY3JQQMZHBYH
    Media URN:
    VLVA2IRQK6PU8P315GY3JQQMZHBYH
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    26/11/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:33:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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