• Short Summary

    In then United States, scientists are studying the possible use of satellites to provide part of the country's energy needs.

  • Description

    1.
    GV & SV Goldstone tracking dish moving (3 shots)
    0.50

    2.
    SV & CU Set of receiver panels made of aluminium (3 shots)
    1.15

    3.
    SV & CU Project manager Richard Dickinson and staff working in control room (10 shots)
    1.44

    4.
    LV Receiver tower outside window
    1.46

    5.
    LV, GV & SV Lights on hillside go on and off in response to movements of antenna (4 shots)
    2.06

    6.
    SV & CU Teleprinter (2 shots)
    2.11

    7.
    CU Animation of energy satellites beaming over earth (4 shots)
    2.40

    8.
    GV & SV Goldstone tracking station and dish (4 shots)
    3.00


    COMMENTATOR: "This is NASA's Goldstone tracking station near Barstow, California. Normally used to communicate with interplanetary spacecraft, the big 85-foot Venus dish, as it is called, is now also serving as a research tool to study the problems of beaming converted solar energy from a satellite in space back to earth, where it can be re-converted to electricity. For the tests, the 85-foot antenna represents an energy satellite. From its vantage point in space it would collect and convert sunlight energy into electricity. A mile away, a 25-foot high set of receiver panels called the rectenna, play the role of a ground station. Made of aluminium, the more than 4,500 small rectenna elements are T-shaped and about four inches long. They work like a TV antenna to gather and filtre the microwave energy, converting it to electric current that could be fed directly to a utility. With the antenna zeroed-in on the mile-away receiver panel, microwave power transmission project manager Richard Dickinson orders the power brought up slowly in 25-milowatt increments. On a hillside beneath the receiver tower, a bank of 17 lights begins flickering on, reaching full intensity as the power increases. The lights go off and on as the big antenna tilts up and down and swings right and left...now one the rectenna, now off. The results have been very promising, as Goldstone researchers successfully collected the microwave beam and converted it to usable electricity with an efficiency of 82 per cent. If the energy satellite concept were successfully developed, it could lead to a network of energy satellites that would collect solar energy 24 hours a day, beaming it to stations on the ground...a wireless system capable of delivering electricity on a vast scale. Ever hear of ten gigawatts? Well that's ten billion watts...ten thousand megawatts of electric power, and it would have to come from a very large spacecraft. Although the invisible beam travels only a mile across the desert here in Barstow, California, this energy simulation represents a possible massive new power supply for earth in the future."




    Initials OS/1830



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In then United States, scientists are studying the possible use of satellites to provide part of the country's energy needs. Scientists working for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration say one large satellite could provide up to 10,000 megawatts of electric power ... enough to take care of the energy needs of one-third of the Los Angeles Basin. Here's report on the research.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2IQ9GW22BVRIIZ8B2M9TG8CM7
    Media URN:
    VLVA2IQ9GW22BVRIIZ8B2M9TG8CM7
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    19/09/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:00:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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