• Short Summary

    SYDNEY AND MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

    An Australian research team has developed a bionic ear which they hope will enable the totally deaf to hear again.

  • Description

    MELBOURNE: (OCTOBER 16):
    1. SV & GV Susan Walters walking along beach (2 shots) 0.12
    SYDNEY: (RECENT):
    2. GV & SVs Surgical team implanting bionic ear, Professor William Gibson heading team (3 shots) 0.33
    3. CU PULL BACK TO SVs & GV Walters undergoing tests after operation (4 shots) 0.33
    MELBOURNE: (OCTOBER 16):
    4. SV GRAPHIC Sound waves travelling via speech processor and head set to implant 0.41
    5. SV Susan Walters speaking (SOT) 1.06
    6. GV & SVs Deaf children at New South Wales Institution for Deaf and Blind, communicating in deaf and dumb language (5 shots) 1.19
    7. SV Walters speaking with nurse 1.25
    8. CUs SVs Walters adjusting machinery in test with doctor (5 shots) 1.38
    SYDNEY (RECENT)/MELBOURNE (OCTOBER 16):
    9. SV STILL FRAME & SV Sue Walters hearing voice for first time and replying over still frame (SOT) then continuing (2 shots)' 2.06
    TRANSCRIPT
    SUSAN WALTERS: (SEQ. FIVE): "It was a bit funny at first, because the noises were so strange. At first it sounded, everything sounded like Space Invaders machines or something. There are so many different noises here, and all electrical. But I was surprised how well I could understand people."
    DOCTOR: (SEQ. 9): "Hello, Susan."
    SUSAN WALTERS: "It wasn't working at first and then they did something else to the computer, then finally one note came through and then after that, they spoke to me and it was better speech still."
    InitialsBB/BB

    NOTE TO EDITORS: THIS STORY HAS COMMENTARY BY CHANNEL SEVEN'S PAUL DOUGHERTY WHICH MAY BE USED IF REQUIRED.
    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: SYDNEY AND MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

    An Australian research team has developed a bionic ear which they hope will enable the totally deaf to hear again. Three Australians have already had a new ear implanted -- among them Susan Walters of Melbourne. She went completely deaf a year ago after contracting encephalitis (inflammation of part of the brain). A surgical team headed by Professor William Gibson of Sydney University performed Susan Walters' operation in September. Her new ear, developed by Professor Graham Clark of the Melbourne Research Centre for the Deaf, uses 20 channels to process sounds, instead of the single channel on existing products. She said it was very strange at first to hear again, but she was surprised how well she could understand people. Young deaf and dumb children still have to converse in sign language -- but it is hoped that one day the bionic ear will help them towards speech again. The camera captured Susan Walter's expression when she first heard a sound -- the computer had to be adjusted, but when it worked, she was clearly delighted.

    Source: CHANNEL SEVEN, AUSTRALIA

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2ERG2O1VQVMMM6TOW5TQDJT05
    Media URN:
    VLVA2ERG2O1VQVMMM6TOW5TQDJT05
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    19/10/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:07:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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