• Short Summary

    Water jumps were being filled and bookmakers were setting up their stands at Aintree, near Liverpool, on Thursday (29 March) in preparation for what many consider the world's greatest steeplechase - the Grand National.

  • Description

    Water jumps were being filled and bookmakers were setting up their stands at Aintree, near Liverpool, on Thursday (29 March) in preparation for what many consider the world's greatest steeplechase - the Grand National.

    Thirty-eight horses are in the field for Saturday's (March 31) race over four miles 856 yards - and over some of the most formidable fences to be found anywhere.

    Already security is tight at the stables that will house some of the world's best steeplechasers.

    The latest betting places Red Rum, Crisp, Princess Camilla and L'Escargot as leading favourites for the event.

    Once again the race is taking place under a threat that Aintree racecourse is to be sold. Mrs. Mirabel Topham, whose family has run the race since 1899, says that contracts selling the racecourse for about GBP3 million (7 million US dollars) will be signed after Saturday' race.

    The sale has been talked about since 1964. Development is thought likely on the part of the course not given over to racing.

    But even if the racecourse is sold, Mrs. Topham says the race that has been held since the 1830's, will continue to be run at Aintree.

    SYNOPSIS: Saturday is Grand National Day at Aintree Racecourse, England. And the stands will then be full of cheering people as thirty-eight horses compete in a race that many consider the greatest steeple-chase in the world.

    Between them and the finish are some of the most formidable fences to be found anywhere. Not a year passes without some falls....many of them spectacular.

    On Thursday, the water jumps were being filled - and the fences built up. This year there is a thirty-thousand pound prize for the winner over the gruelling four-mile eight-hundred-and-fifty-six yard course.

    Security is already tight at the stables though the Grand National horses had not yet arrived.

    Once again the race takes place under the threat that the racecourse is going to be sold. Since 1964, the Topham family, who own the course, have been trying to sell.

    Mrs. Mirabel Topham, says that contracts selling the racecourse for three million pounds will be signed after Saturday's race. But Mrs. Topham says the race that has been run since the eighteen-thirties will continue to be run at Aintree. The first horses arriving were for early races, in the programme.

    The early betting placed Red Rum, Crisp, Princess Camilla and L'Escargo among the favourites. But outsiders have a surprising habit of being first past the Grand National winning post.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2CUWY2N3NRG0ANUSRHH7Q3JUS
    Media URN:
    VLVA2CUWY2N3NRG0ANUSRHH7Q3JUS
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    29/03/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:30:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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