• Short Summary

    A move to re-equip and modernise Mozambique's ports and railways is underway.

  • Description

    1.
    GV PULL BACK TO SV Port of Maputo harbour with ships loading.
    0.10

    2.
    SV & CU Coke wagons being lifted, then emptied into ships hold, returned down lift. (6 SHOTS)
    1.00

    3.
    GV Coke terminal with containers.
    1.07

    4.
    SV PULL BACK GV Workers pulling off tarpaulin from coke wagon.
    1.20

    5.
    GV Sugar storage tank.
    1.26

    6.
    SV TILT UP FROM Harbour to water two ships awaiting loading.
    1.36

    7.
    CU & SV Ship's name (Matchedje), container loading lift. (2 SHOTS)
    1.47

    8.
    GV & SV Workers loading cartons into container for shipment. (2 SHOTS)
    1.58

    9.
    GV PAN Various types of containers waiting to be loaded. South African, Belgian, USA and USSR transport company containers. (10 SHOTS)
    2.27

    10.
    GV Shots of Maputo's port installations (power loaders). (5 SHOTS)
    2.48

    11.
    GV Ship at dock.
    2.51

    12.
    GV Dock workers at end of day shift, leaving. (2 SHOTS)
    3.06


    The countries represented at the Lusaka summit meeting in April were Angola, Butswana, Les???th???, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.





    Initials JS/



    EDITORS: PLEASE NOTE THAT VISNEWS WILL BE ISSUING A REPORT ON THE MOZAMBICAN PORT OF BEIRA IN THE NEAR FUTURE.

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: A move to re-equip and modernise Mozambique's ports and railways is underway. It follows a conference in Lusaka in April when leaders from nine black southern African countries met to plan their countries' "economic liberation" from South Africa. The conference decided that transport and communications were the key to gradual disengagement. The first priority during the next decade will be to rehabilitate rail links through Mozambique to the ports of Beira and Maputo which can service the landlocked states.

    SYNOPSIS: Maputo, like the other Mozambique ports of Beira and Nicala, was especially constructed to serve the African hinterland. For the past four years, however, the ports have been cut off from their natural markets and have been op???rating below their normal capacity. Traffic was suspended when Mozambique sealed its border with Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe, on achieving independence from Portugal in 1975. But trains to Zimbabwe started running again earlier this year after the former British colony achieved independence.

    Both Zambia and Zaire want to get traffic moving again on a railway line running through their countries to the Mozambique ports.

    Mozambique was visited recently by President Mobutu Sese Sek??? of Zaire, for the resumption of his country's copper and cobalt exports. He was closely followed by President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia who came for talks about renewing Zambian copper exports through the former Portuguese colony.

    President Samora Machel of Mozambique has told port workers at Maputo that Zaire's imports and exports would soon be flowing through the railhead harbours of Maputo and Beira. The move by the African nations to reduce dependence on South Africa has come at a time when their need for the white-ruled republic's food, transport and other resources has seldom seemed so vital.

    Despite the agreement of the southern African leaders it may be some time before trains move cargo through Mozambique rather than South Africa. That was the conclusion of a southern African Transport and Communications Commission working group which met in Maputo last week. They say the first problem will be obtaining enough railway wagons. Then there is the bad condition of the railway track. To repair damage elsewhere in the country during the war, the Rhodesians pulled up 63 miles (about 101 kilometres) of track on their side of the Mozambican border. This must be replaced before the line can be reopened from Salisbury to Maputo.

    Mozambique needs to spend at least one hundred million pounds (about two hundred million dollars) on its railways and a similar amount on its ports. Despite the political commitment made at Lusaka, there may be a long wait before this port can handle increased export traffic.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2ABIDNI6OT24TS91LI2RMRZXI
    Media URN:
    VLVA2ABIDNI6OT24TS91LI2RMRZXI
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    09/07/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:05:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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