• Short Summary

    Mexicans went to the polls on Sunday (July 1) to elect the entire lower chamber of deputies and seven state governors.

  • Description

    Mexicans went to the polls on Sunday (July 1) to elect the entire lower chamber of deputies and seven state governors.

    So deeply entrenched in President Luis Echeverria's Institutional Revolutionary Party (P.R.I.) which has been in power since 1929 that the election outcome is considered a foregone conclusion.

    The P.R.I. seemed to be more concerned about voter absenteeism than about its opponents.

    And although the avenues of Mexico City are lined with gaudy campaign posters on trees and walls the campaign in general has been low key.

    Local issues, including alleged Government corruption, the rising cost of living and the resurgence of guerrilla movements dominate the elections.

    This time the minimum age of deputies has been lowered from 25 to 21 an opposition parties have been given free time on radio and television during one campaign.

    The main opposition group the National Action Party (P.A.N.) has also accused President Echeverria's Government of squandering public funds to promote him as a leader of the "Third World".

    The Government says it has maintained political stability in Mexico and made it one of the most prosperous countries in Latin America.

    Translation of the Spanish comments of the Popular Socialist Party (PPS) candidate Belisario Aguilar Olivera: "I hope that the two million young people will make the PPS stronger. We want to get power as far as we can through a democratic vote without blood but still to oppose United States imperialism. The young know the need of socialism. We work partially with the actual Government for the good of the country."
    Translation of the remarks by Sr. Carlos Madrazo PRI candidate: "The elections are very important for democracy in Mexico. My party is the strongest because it represents the biggest sector of Mexican interests. Our politics remain true to the way of the Mexican revolution."
    The fourth party contesting the election P.A.R.M. the Austenitic Party of the Mexican Revolution, has the support of less than six per cent of Mexican voters.

    A total of 707 candidates are standing for the 94 deputy seats.

    SYNOPSIS: Mexicans went to the polls on Sunday to elect the entire lower chamber of deputies and seven state governors. And although the avenues are lined with election posters - the campaign has been low key.

    For President Luis Echeverria's Institutional Revolutionary Party. P.R.I., has been in power since 1929. The election outcome in considered a foregone conclusion. The governing party say they have maintained political stability in Mexico and made it one of the most prosperous countries in Latin America.

    It is the first test for a new electoral law designed to broaden democracy. The minimum age of deputies has been lowered to 21. And opposition parties have been given free time on television. The Popular Socialist Party, PPS, hopes to improve its position with the help of new voters.

    PPS candidate Mr. Belisario Aguilar Olivera emphasised his hopes that Mexico's two million young voters would make his party stronger. His party wanted to get power as far as they could through the democratic vote. But they were determined to oppose United States imperialism in Mexico. The young people understood the need for socialism. But they would work partially with the actual Government for the good of the country.

    Antonio Loyola Chavez is a candidate for the main opposition party, the National Action Party, P.A.N.

    His party has accused President Echeverria's Government of squandering public funds to promote him as a leader of the Third World. It has traditionally been the party of bankers are property owner ??? it has also been promising social reform. It has the support of about fourteen per cent of the voters
    The opposition claims the Government is already spending taxes to be collected in 1975 and has pushed Mexico into an economic quagmire
    Then a P.R.I. Candidate Carlos Madrazo spoke.

    Snr. Madrazo said the elections were important for democracy in Mexico. The Institutional Revolutionary Party was strongest because it represented the biggest section of Mexican interests. Their politics remained true to the way of the Mexican revolution. They fought for the progress of Mexico and peaceful relations with the rest of the world. The party is particularly well supported by Government employees and country dwellers. It normally gets around seventy per cent of votes.

    Troops stood by to avert incidents and guard the ballot boxes. But the greatest threat to the election was thought to be voter absenteeism. Twenty five million Mexicans are registered to vote but rates of absenteeism have traditionally been high.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA27TJ5SN4ZHQUFO258ZFA35ZZN
    Media URN:
    VLVA27TJ5SN4ZHQUFO258ZFA35ZZN
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/07/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:06:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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