• Short Summary

    Chile is getting back to normal following the three week "Bosses strike" against the government of President Salvatore Allenda.

  • Description

    Chile is getting back to normal following the three week "Bosses strike" against the government of President Salvatore Allenda.

    It ended on Sunday night (5 November) after a long bargaining session between strike leaders and government officials, including the Interior Minister, Carlos Prats.

    A state of emergency, imposed to counter the effects of the strike, was later lifted.

    Shopkeepers in Santiago did a roaring trade on Monday as they reopened their doors. Stores were packed with people anxious to begin spending a 100 per cent salary increase they were awarded two weeks ago to compensate for a similar rise in the cost of living in the first nine months of this year.

    Reports from elsewhere showed that lorry drivers -- who first pulled their vehicles off the road and started the strike -- were working again.

    But on Monday (6 November) Senor Leon Vilarin, leader of the Lorry Drivers' Union, warned of the possibility of a new strike. Senor vilarin, reading a statement on behalf of all the strike leaders, said there were fundamental points which had not been made clear by the government.

    SYNOPSIS: Chile's so called "Bosses Strike" ended on sunday night after exhaustive talks between strikers' leaders and Interior Minister, Carlos Prats, seen together here. The strike, which began three weeks ago, was seen as the first major challenge to the Marxist government of President Allende, elected two years ago.

    On Monday, shopkeepers in Santiago did a roaring trade as they reopened their doors. Stores were packed with people anxious to spend a one hundred per cent salary increase awarded to them two weeks previously to compensate for a similar rise in the cost of living in the first nine months of the year.

    The strike started when lorry owners took their vehicles off the road in protest against a government transport plan which they said would lead to nationalisation of the industry. Thousands of self-employed people joined them and there was support, too, from engineers, airline pilots, students and others. The government later agreed to drop its transport plan, and make a number of other concessions. However, strikers' leaders warn there could be further trouble if some fundamental issues aren't settled to their satisfaction....and soon.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA26VWHQRD8UFMW20O1XJNXJ25W
    Media URN:
    VLVA26VWHQRD8UFMW20O1XJNXJ25W
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    07/11/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:24:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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