• Short Summary

    Former Ugandan President, Professor Yusufu Lule and Tanzanian President Julius Nyerere have embarked on a duel of allegations and criticisms against one another.

  • Description

    Former Ugandan President, Professor Yusufu Lule and Tanzanian President Julius Nyerere have embarked on a duel of allegations and criticisms against one another. professor Lule, who led Uganda for about ten weeks after dictator Idi Amin was overthrown, claimed in London on Wednesday (25 July) that Tanzania was trying to make Uganda a satellite state. He said Tanzanian troops in the country were behaving like an army of occupation. the following day, dr Nyerere described Professor Lule as "a liar and a fool" for alleging that Tanzanian wanted to take over Uganda. Meanwhile, Uganda is trying to recover from the ravages of the war against Tanzanian troops and the disasters of seven years under Idi Amin.

    SYNOPSIS: This hospital at Nkozi, south of the capital of Kampala, has suffered the impact of three different assaults -- from Amin's fleeing soldiers, from Tanzanian artillery and looting villagers. On March the seventeenth, Amin's men ordered the white nursing sisters to leave the Catholic mission -- two have gone, two stayed behind. The same day, Tanzanian shells ripped into the hospital, then the villagers began looting. Two Dutch doctors have left because medical supplies are exhausted.

    Further to the south-west, stands the hospital at Mbarara, the first major town hit by the Tanzanians. The hospital has no drugs, refrigeration or transport. Its staff has been reduced by half -- to a mere six Ugandan doctors and eighty-nine nurses, caring for five hundred outpatients a day. Again, looters have taken their toll of beds, mattresses, sheets and blankets.

    Here at the Ruwenzori National Park, the actions of Tanzanian troops have underlined Professor Lule's accusations that they are undisciplined, and contributing to a deteriorating state of affairs. Newsmen shown recently through the park reported that the Tanzanians had slaughtered more than twenty-five percent of the wildlife there. Acting chief warden William Ochira, told Newsmen the commanding officer of the Tanzanians garrisoned in the park had assured him he would try to control his men, but nothing had changed. The park, the second largest in Uganda, spreads over two thousand square kilometres (772 square miles), and its force of rangers has been halved -- to seven. Mr Ochira said soldiers caught slaughtering animals claimed they weren't being paid, and they were killing animals to sell meat to local people for money.

    A buffalo, like this one,. sells for around five hundred Ugandan shillings -- about sixty-five U.S. Dollars -- and a dead hippo fetches between sixty-five and one hundred and forty dollars. Petrified animals now shy well clear of visitors.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA24EWXKCUZI9R4W9MELS42N67M
    Media URN:
    VLVA24EWXKCUZI9R4W9MELS42N67M
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    26/07/1979
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:04:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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