• Short Summary

    On Wednesday (December 6), the United Nations Security Council voted to continue direct talks with South Africa on the problem of the administration of Namibia (Southwest Africa).

  • Description

    On Wednesday (December 6), the United Nations Security Council voted to continue direct talks with South Africa on the problem of the administration of Namibia (Southwest Africa). The resolution--proposed by Argentine Delegate Carlos Ortiz de Rozas--was adopted by a vote of 13 in favour, none against...but Russia abstained and China declared non-participation in the vote.

    Namibia is a mineral-rich former German colony, administered by South Africa under a defunct League of Nations mandate, which was rescinded by the U.N. in 1966. But South Africa has refused to accept the U.N. decision. A recent report on the situation--by Secretary General Waldheim's representative Alfred Escher of Switzerland--was bitterly criticised because he said that some of South African Prime Minister John Vorster's policies for the territory appeared acceptable in principle.

    Under the new resolution, Mr. Waldheim is authorized "to continue his valuable efforts", and report back to the Council on April 30. Although some delegates gelt this date might be too soon, it is understood that it was set because the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) summit meeting in Addis Ababa in May, is expected to discuss the Southwest Africa situation.

    SYNOPSIS: On Wednesday, the United Nations Security Council voted in favour of continuing direct talks with South Africa on the problem of Namibia (Southwest Africa). The resolution, proposed by Argentine Ambassador Carlos Ortiz de Rozas, followed a discussion on a report on the problem by Secretary General Waldheim's representative William Escher. Opposing both the report and the resolution was Soviet Ambassador Jacob Malik--here speaking.

    Ambassador Malik said the Namibian people should have self-determination and independent...but that South African Prime Minister Vorster continued to break Namibia up into homelands, perpetuating colonial authority.

    He also said that South Africa "had tried to use the Secretary General's efforts" to cover the policies of oppression. He was referring to members of the Security Council--mainly Africans--who had bitterly criticised Mr. Escher--for saying that he had found some of Prime Minister Vorster's policies acceptable in principle.

    Namibia is a mineral-rich former German colony, which has been administrated by south Africa under a mandate of the now-defunct League of Nations. In 1966, the United Nations rescinded the mandate--but South Africa has refused to accept the U.N. decision.

    Then Council President Sen called for the vote on the Argentine resolution.

    The resolution was accepted by thirteen votes in favour--none against. But Russia abstained, and China declared non-participation in the vote. The new report is expected on April 30th--in time for the Addis Ababa OAU Summit in May, at which time they too are expected to discuss the situation in Namibia.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA247R0Z1X6XYVFMNNEY3CBQXV3
    Media URN:
    VLVA247R0Z1X6XYVFMNNEY3CBQXV3
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/12/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:02:27:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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