• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Kenyans celebrated the 18th anniversary of their country's independence on Monday (1 June), and thousands of people gathered at Nairobi's Uhuru Park to watch a military parade and display of tribal dancing.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Police at head of motorcade.
    0.06

    2.
    SV President Moi (right) with Indian President Reddy leaving car.
    0.14

    3.
    SV Military band marches past.
    0.26

    4.
    GV Kenyan armed forces in combat gear march past, women first, then men.
    0.45

    5.
    SV Police dog handlers march past.
    0.53

    6.
    GV Gun carriages drawn past.
    1.00

    7.
    SV Tribal dancers in costume with ostrich feathers. (2 SHOTS)
    1.20

    8.
    SV The two presidents look on.
    1.26

    9.
    SV President Reddy gets in car as crowds look on. (2 SHOTS)
    1.36

    10.
    SV The two presidents wave as car departs.
    1.41




    Initials JS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Kenyans celebrated the 18th anniversary of their country's independence on Monday (1 June), and thousands of people gathered at Nairobi's Uhuru Park to watch a military parade and display of tribal dancing. President Daniel Arap Moi and President Neelam Sanjiva Reddy of India, who is on a state visit to Kenya, attended the ceremony.

    SYNOPSIS: Kenya gained independence from Britain in 1963. Since then the country has remained largely free from the strife that has plagued many of its neighbours. President Reddy's visit symbolises Kenya's good neighbour policies abroad. In the West, Kenya is seen as a moderate and stable country. It is largely committed to the system of private enterprise.

    However the country has faced some serious economic political problems. A fall in coffee and tea prices in 1979 upset the budgeting that had kept the economy sound. Other flaws in the economy soon appeared, and last year the Government made economic changes to conform to World Bank guidelines. The result was an 89 million dollar aid package. Large quantities of grain have had to be imported. And the latest official economic review predicts grim months ahead.

    The Independence Day celebrations provide the Kenyan people with one of their most colourful rituals of the year. They also bring an address from the President. On Monday President Moi sought to reassure his people that the nation had not lost its sense of direction. His motto was "Nyaya", which means follow me. A popular joke in some political circles, follows that slogan with the question, "To Where".

    During the past month, doctors struck for higher pay, and Nairobi University was closed after student demonstrations. But in Monday's speech President Moi said the Government was in full control of the country's future.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA1W6VJ0F0KZFZA40IINUMBRGQ8
    Media URN:
    VLVA1W6VJ0F0KZFZA40IINUMBRGQ8
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    02/06/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:40:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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