• Short Summary

    About 4,000 people have been detained in Chile following the military coup on tuesday (11th September).

  • Description

    1.
    CU & GV Troops with guns and tanks in Streets (3 shots)
    0.18

    2.
    SV & CU troops checking civilians papers and body searching them
    0.30

    3.
    GV Rains of Moneda Palace
    0.35

    4.
    CU & GV Damage to interior of Palace (6 shots)
    1.01

    5.
    GV New Minister of Interior speaking to Press
    1.05

    6.
    CU Press
    1.09

    7.
    GV Minister speaking
    1.20

    8.
    GV Press looking at rows of weapons (4 shots)
    1.41

    9.
    SV dead sniper lying on pavement
    1.49

    10.
    GV Troops walking down street.
    2.03



    Initials AE/22.09 AE/22.30


    THIS FILM INCLUDES AN ENGLISH COMMENTARY FOR GUIDANCE BY N.B.C. REPORTER STEVE DELANEY. THE TEXT OF THIS IS GIVEN BELOW. AN ALTERNATIVE VISNEWS SCRIPT IS PROVIDED.

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: About 4,000 people have been detained in Chile following the military coup on tuesday (11th September). The new Minister of the Interior, Army General Oscar Bonilla announced this on Sunday (16th September) in a nationwide television broadcast.

    Chile's new leader, General Pinochet, has said that less than one hundred people died in the fighting between the armed forces and police on one side and armed supporters of the leftwing coalition Government of President Salvador Allends on the other. Some estimates put the figures as high as 20,000.

    The military has announced that President Allende committed suicide as tanks and jets bombarded the Presidential Place - the Moneda - on Tuesday. The Palace was virtually destroyed by the raids.

    Journalists were later allowed to inspect the damage. They were also shown weapons the new authorities said they had confiscated from President Allende's supporters. Visnews cameraman, Ariel Onetta, was in Santiago when the coup happened and filmed the dramatic event. At one stage bullets were hitting the wall behind him. His film is the first independent film to come out of Chile since the coup.

    By Saturday, life in the capital was reported to be returning to normal, but a few snipers continued to fire at the troops.

    President Allende's widow. Hortesina, has now arrived in Mexico where she has been granted political asylum.

    The coup ends three years of rule by President Allende's left wing coalition government.

    There were still plenty of troops around because the armed forces -the new government - was still uncertain that its claims of absolute control over the situation were absolutely true. Still, the people of Santiago needed the right papers to move around - to go from one place to another. The papers were different, the people who were looking at these were more through than it had been before the takeover.

    This is the Monede - destroyed. Reporters were shown through it. The place where the Allende brand of Marxism had flourished and had been vanquished. During the three days of uncertainty before the army achieved control perhaps ten thousand people died in Chile. The country's borders are still closed and may be until mid-week. This film came out of the country in an Uruguayan airforce plane and is the first non-government to look at what happened last week in Santiago.

    Bonilla held a news conference in which he said the new military government was firstly in control of the country and that the situation in Chile and in the capital would be back to normal just as soon as possible. Members of the military junta said about the same thing later in the day. There was tour for reporters of what seemed like acres of confiscated weapons - molotov cocktails, guns of every description - things the military said had been the Allende forces in resisting the coup.

    Snipers fire continued later into the week, and then the new military government would capture one. And in this case they brought him down out of the building and put him on the sidewalk for display for about six hours. But for the country in general, the days of gunfire and violence seems to be over, and all that remained was getting used to the new government in chile and seeing how it would handle the country's problems which did not go away when Allende died and the general took over.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA1PPA3FF73AYUEXJBFCFIIQUTO
    Media URN:
    VLVA1PPA3FF73AYUEXJBFCFIIQUTO
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    17/09/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:02:03:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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