• Short Summary

    In Washington, the former President of the United Auto Workers Union, Leonard Woodcock, was sworn in as U.

  • Description

    1.
    SV INTERIOR Ambassador Woodcock taking oath in Washington as Ambassador to China
    0.18

    2.
    GV U.S. Embassy building in Peking
    0.22

    3.
    SV Chinese officials having photograph taken in front of Embassy (3 shots)
    0.37

    4.
    GV Crowds lining route outside Embassy building (3 shots)
    0.45

    5.
    SV INT Ambassador Michael Blumenthal seated at desk with papers as embassy officials look on (3 shots)
    0.58

    6.
    LV Blumenthal walks to microphone
    1.07

    7.
    CU Group of American women looking on as Blumenthal makes speech (2 shots)
    1.25

    8.
    CU Officials removing U.S. Embassy sign
    1.31

    9.
    CU New plaque is unveiled (2 shots)
    1.38


    WOMAN JUDGE: "That I will well and faithfully discharge...."



    WOODCOCK: "That I will well and faithfully discharge..."



    JUDGE: "The duties of the office."



    WOODCOCK: "The duties of the office."



    JUDGE: "On which I am about to enter."



    WOODCOCK: "On which I am about to enter."



    JUDGE: "So help me God."



    WOODCOCK: "So help me God."



    JUDGE: "Congratulations."



    WOODCOCK: "Thank-you." (APPLAUSE)



    KALB: "It was a few minutes before noon. And everyone had a feeling of being lucky spectators at an unforgettable moment in U.S.-China relations. And they wanted a souvenir. A last picture of the U.S. Laison Office Emblem that had been on display here for six years. Across the street a few hundred Chinese looked on, their reactions ranging from simple curiosity to an awareness that something very important was taking place.



    "Inside the compound, Treasury Secretary Blumenthal met with a group of American business representatives, all of them hoping to get a slice of what they see as a vast new market among China's one billion population. Then, exactly at noon, the switchover took place, from Liaison Office to......Embassy, with Blumenthal representing President Carter, pointing up the significance of the event."



    BLUMENTHAL: "It is in the interest of the United States and the world, that the Chinese people succeed in their full modernisation. Out history and our political and economic systems are different, yet we can trade together, and we can work together for a better world."



    KALB: "The symbols of change then took place. A new Embassy emblem replacing the old emblem, followed by the unveiling of a brass plaque telling the world that this was now the Embassy of the United States."




    Initials BB/


    TELERECORDING
    REPORTER: BERNARD KALB

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In Washington, the former President of the United Auto Workers Union, Leonard Woodcock, was sworn in as U.S. Ambassador to China on Wednesday (28 February). Mr. Woodcock has been instrumental in the finalising of diplomatic relations between the U.S. and China. He also served as an intermediary for U.S. business interests and the Chinese Government. The appointment of Ambassador Woodcock raises the status of the U.S. Liaison office in Peking to that of Embassy. As Mr. Woodcock was sworn in, the new Embassy was being made ready in Peking. The reporter is Bernard Kalb.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA1JSXLKMMP9845U93OCC57JKAU
    Media URN:
    VLVA1JSXLKMMP9845U93OCC57JKAU
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/03/1979
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:39:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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