• Short Summary

    Next week, President Tito of Yugoslavia will have a double celebration: his 85th birthday on Wednesday (25 May) and the 40th anniversary of his leadership of the Yugoslav Communist party.

  • Description

    1.
    1974:CU ZOOM OUT: Tito seated with Arafat.
    0.10

    2.
    SV: Tito down steps with officers (Black and White)
    0.16

    3.
    TV AND CU: Partisan soldiers assembling, Tito with officers watching from balcony (2 shots)
    0.27

    4.
    GV AND SV: Yugoslav Federal Assembly voting, 1953. (2 shots)
    0.34

    5.
    CU: Tito acknowledges applause and speaks from rostrum. (3 shots)
    0.43

    6.
    CU: Tito and wife greeted on visit to Moscow, 1956.
    0.54

    7.
    GV EXTERIOR: ticker-tape welcome in Cairo, 1966.
    0.59

    8.
    CU INTERIOR: Tito and Nasser with wives.
    1.09

    9.
    CU: Tito and Nasser seated.
    1.12

    10.
    CU: Tito passes dancers in Kenya, 1970. (2 shots) (colour)
    1.19

    11.
    CU: Tito and Kenyatta in open car.
    1.22

    12.
    SV INTERIOR: Tito greeting Nixon and sitting at conference table, 1970. (3 shots)
    1.34

    13.
    GV AND CU: Tito addressing Yugoslav Assembly. (3 shots) (Black and white)
    1.42

    14.
    Tito shakes hands with Kosygin, Podgorny and Brezhnev, 1972.
    1.47

    15.
    SV: guests applaud while Tito receives award from Podgorny (3 shots)
    2.02

    16.
    1976: SV AND CU: Tito arriving in Colombo. (4 shots)
    2.30

    17.
    CU: Yugoslav and Soviet flags.
    2.33

    18.
    CU: Brezhnev walks forward, embraced by Tito.
    2.45

    19.
    1977: GV PAN EXTERIOR: Gaddafi's Palace, Tripoli.
    2.50

    20.
    SV INTERIOR: Tito and Gaddafi seated on settee with child, officials watching. (3 shots)
    3.18



    Initials RH/JH/MR/1600



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Next week, President Tito of Yugoslavia will have a double celebration: his 85th birthday on Wednesday (25 May) and the 40th anniversary of his leadership of the Yugoslav Communist party. To mark the occasion, the Yugoslav National Assembly has given him a third award of the Order of National Hero.

    SYNOPSIS: Marshal Tito's career has spanned the mid-20th century --from the time of Winston Churchill and Josef Stalin to that of Yasser Arafat.

    He made his name fighting the Nazis as a partisan leader in the mountains of Bosnia in the second world war. He had been a Communist since 1917 -- when, as a released prisoner, he fought with the revolutionaries in Russia.

    With the war over, Tito was left the undisputed leader of his country. Elections gave his National Liberation Front a clear majority. Yugoslavia became a Federal Republic, and Tito its Prime Minister. In 1953, he was elected President.

    Acute differences with the Soviet Union, which had developed in Stalin's later years, were to some extent reconciled under Stalin's successors. President Tito was welcomed in Moscow in 1956 -- but his interest was more in the third world. He and the late President Nasser of Egypt -- together with Jawaharlal Nehru of India and Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana -- were the original moving spirits of the non-aligned movement.

    Increasing age has not dimmed his enthusiasm for travelling. He was the guest of another elder statesman -- President Kenyatta of Kenya in February 1970.

    President Nixon's visit to Belgrade in the same year recognised the special position Yugoslavia had achieved under President Tito: a Communist country that was also an important trading partner of the west.

    At home, the early 1970s saw some restlessness among the different republics of Yugoslavia; but President Tito's dominating personality kept it in check.

    1972: The Soviet leaders assembled to welcome President Tito, and see him presented by President Podgorny with the Order of Lenin. Officially it marked his 80th birthday; it was also another reconciliation, after Tito's outspoken criticism of Soviet action in Czechoslovakia in 1968.

    Last year, this remarkable veteran was just beginning to show his age -- now 84 -- descending the aircraft steps after the long flight from Belgrade to Sri Lanka. He had come for another summit conference of the non-aligned countries in Colombo. He had his hostess, Mrs. Bandaranaike, were among the few survivors still in office of the first non-aligned summit: the one he himself had called in Belgrade 15 years ago.

    Soon afterwards he was reported to be ill; but he recovered to greet the Soviet leader, Mr. Brezhnev, in November. Despite the display of friendship, President Tito again underlined his determination to keep Yugoslavia independent.

    Early this year, he was off again -- to North Africa. In the Libyan Jamahiriyah, he had a pleasant and informal meeting with Colonel Gaddafi -- a man who was born about the time that Josip Broz Tito was assembling his partisans and approaching his fiftieth birthday. With his long experience; his achievement in maintaining unity at home and a delicate balance poised between east and west, scarcely a leader in the world is not glad to seek his counsel.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA1G38CSHB83BOO7BO53ZAPWPE9
    Media URN:
    VLVA1G38CSHB83BOO7BO53ZAPWPE9
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    20/05/1977
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:03:18:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment