• Short Summary

    South Africa and the United Nations -- represented by a committee of five major Western powers -- negotiated late into Friday night (23 September) on the future of Namibia (formerly South West Africa).

  • Description

    1.
    GV EXTERIOR: government building, Pretoria, South Africa.
    0.06

    2.
    SV INTERIOR: United Nations Security Council Namibia issue representatives from France, West Germany, Canada, United States, and Britain.
    0.16

    3.
    CU: U.S. Permanent Representative to U.N., Don McHenry PAN TO U.S. delegate William Bowdler, and David Scott of Britain.
    0.27

    4.
    CU: British Minister and Permanent Representative to U.N., James Murray.
    0.30

    5.
    CU: Hans-Joachim Eick, West German Ambassador to South Africa (left) and West German delegate Helmut Muller.
    0.37

    6.
    SVs: South African Prime Minister John Vorster entering conference hall and shaking hands with delegates. (2 shots)
    0.58

    7.
    SV: Vorster and South African Minister for Foreign Affairs, Pic Botha, seated, PAN TO British delegation AND GV PAN around conference table. (2 shots)
    1.14



    Initials RH/0102



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: South Africa and the United Nations -- represented by a committee of five major Western powers -- negotiated late into Friday night (23 September) on the future of Namibia (formerly South West Africa). The two-day talks, designed to find a formula for a popular referendum on independence, were eventually extended into a third day after failing to agree on the future of South African troops in South West Africa.

    SYNOPSIS: The talks began on Thursday (22 September) in Pretoria, and the delegates' agenda included not only the crucial points on the future of South African troops in Namibia in the interim period leading to independence, but also the ??? Turnhalle agreement. This is the compromise reached by South West Africans of all races, and the South African Government, over the future of the territory. But it's not recognised by the leading black nationalist movement, the South West African People's Party -- nor by the United Nations.

    South African Prime Minister John Vorster led his delegation in Thursday's talks. Facing him were members of the five Western powers -- Canada, France, britain, the United States and West Germany. They're all members of the United Nations Security Council and a major factor in threatened economic sanctions against South Africa, although not so far directly in connection with Namibia.

    But at the end of the first day's talks, Mr. Vorster withdrew and left South African Foreign Minister Pic Botha leading his team. His retirement came after clashes which left the whole conference future in doubt.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA1CS4N9WKM9AOR0S15VVEBBH2Q
    Media URN:
    VLVA1CS4N9WKM9AOR0S15VVEBBH2Q
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    23/09/1977
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    MP4
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:14:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment