• Short Summary

    In Northern Ireland, the Protestant Ulster Defence Association (UDA) is putting up new barricades in the eastern part of belfast to create its fourth "no-go" area in the city.

  • Description

    In Northern Ireland, the Protestant Ulster Defence Association (UDA) is putting up new barricades in the eastern part of belfast to create its fourth "no-go" area in the city.

    The barricades were erected only hours after the Irish Republican Army (IRA) called off its ceasefire agreement with the British security forces Sunday (July 9) after the worst clash between the army and Catholics since the ceasefire began on June 27.

    Masked U.D.A. men in combat uniforms stand guard at the barricades of the "Nick" -- the Protestant "no-go" area off Belfast's Shankill Road. Every car is searched before being allowed to enter. The "no-go" area itself is a haven in the strife-torn city where life goes on in a normal way, despite Northern Ireland being threatened by possible civil war.

    Some 12,000 people live int eh "Nick", protected by the UDA and watched by British Troops across the barricades. The UDA its own store, and even maintains a radio station to help disseminate information and coordinate its activities.

    The "no-go" areas of the Catholics, and now of the Protestants pose a serious threat to peace. Each community views the other's "no-go" areas as a point of conflict. Protestant or Catholic families caught in the "no-go" areas of the opposing group are virtually forced out of their homes. One of the main Protestant demands has been the elimination of the Catholic "no-go" areas. And now, feeling that they have been ignored, they have retaliated by establishing their own areas.

    SYNOPSIS: Members of the Protestant Ulster Defence Association set up new barricades following the end of the ceasefire between the Irish Republican army and British security forces on Sunday.

    Masked U.D.A. men in combat uniforms stand guard at the barricades of the "Nick" -- the Protestant "no-go" area off Belfast's Shankill Road...Every car approaching the area is searched before being allowed to enter, and the U.D.A. themselves maintain patrols within the area. The isolation of the "no-go" areas gives a limited amount of security to the people living there from the surrounding city.

    There are about twelve-thousand people who live in the "Nick", protected by the (UDA), and watched by British troops across the barricades. the troops have become such a commonplace event, that children hardly take notice of them. But the men on the barricades carefully monitor the army's activities.

    Within the confines of the "no-go" area things are almost normal. Milk is delivered regularly, and goods are plentiful. The U.D.A. itself operates one store selling U.D.A. badges, scarves, flags, and other insignia. In the Protestant "no-go" areas the activities of the U.D.A. cover the full range of the community's life.

    The U.D.A. even operates a radio station as part of their community activities. The radio station is called "radio Free Nick" and has an operating radius of twelve miles, although technicians claim it can be heard in Scotland. They broadcast sixteen hours a day and claim a listener ship of forty-thousand people. While the "no-go" area gives the residents some security, it represents a point of conflict to the Catholic community.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA1ACMPJYTVO76VQFY8ZL5351P9
    Media URN:
    VLVA1ACMPJYTVO76VQFY8ZL5351P9
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    10/07/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:58:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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