• Short Summary

    The Shah of Iran, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, who once exercised total power in one of the world's vitally strategic countries, has died in Egypt, a cancer-ridden, bitter and rootless man.

  • Description

    1.
    Teheran 1941: SV Shah leaves Parliament building after being sworn in, salutes (Mono)
    0.10

    2.
    1953: GV Statue of Shah's father pulled down, GV Scuffles in street, CU Placard, portrait of Shah
    0.21

    3.
    1961: LV PAN Shah on podium surrounded by large cheering crowd
    0.27

    4.
    1944: SCU Shah with first wife, Princess Fawzia of Egypt, and daughter, Princess Shahnaz
    0.24

    5.
    1951: MV Shah at wedding ceremony with second wife, Soraya Esfandiari
    0.42

    6.
    1959: MV Shah's third wife Farah Diba, down steps, SCU Shah & Farah Diba
    0.48

    7.
    1967: SCU Shah crowns himself at coronation ceremony
    1.05

    8.
    1971: SV Persepolis ruins, GV Guard on wall in costume, GV Cavalry in costume ride past (3 shots)
    1.20

    9.
    GV Shah & Empress watch, LV Parade, PAN TO Band (2 shots)
    1.26

    10.
    Moscow 1974: SV Kosygin Brezhnev & Podgorny seated at table, MV Shah & officials at table, MV PAN Kosygin to Brezhnev (3 shots)
    1.36

    11.
    Paris 1975: SV PULL OUT TO GV Shah & Empress take leave of President Giscard at Elysee Palace
    1.49

    12.
    Iran 1978: SV Crowd, SV Shah walking towards camera, man goes on knees front of Shah (2 shots)
    2.03

    13.
    1978: GV ZOOM INTO SV Demonstrators with Iranian flag & portrait of Ayatollah Khomeini, SV PAN Portrait of Shah thrown from window, SV ZOOM IN Demonstrators, SCO Portrait of Shah Burning (4 shots)
    2.19

    14.
    Morocco 1979: SCU Shah with Empress in garden
    2.32

    15.
    New York: SCU Hospital building, sign
    2.35

    16.
    SCU Empress enters hospital
    2.40

    17.
    SV Demonstrators wit placards outside hospital (2 shots)
    2.54

    18.
    Panama: GV Shah's residence on Contadora Island
    2.58

    19.
    CU Shah speaking in English
    3.10

    20.
    GV EXTERIOR Rifai Mosque in Cairo PAN TO Workmen digging on grounds (2 shots)
    3.26

    21.
    GV Workmen preparing grounds for Shah's burial
    3.29

    22.
    GV Rifai mosque exterior
    3.33


    SHAH: "We were so shocked by this question of hostages that I even volunteered to leave New York hospital when I was under treatment to eventually help solve this problem".





    Initials dn/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The Shah of Iran, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, who once exercised total power in one of the world's vitally strategic countries, has died in Egypt, a cancer-ridden, bitter and rootless man. Deposed as Shah in 1979, he began a seemingly endless journey through temporary homes in the United States, Mexico, Morocco, the Bahamas, Panama and finally Egypt. He died immersed in the sadness of a lost throne of which he believe to the end he was the rightful King.

    SYNOPSIS: Teheran, 1941. The Shah became monarch at the age of 22. His father had abdicated after being removed from power by Western Allies for favouring Nazi Germany. In 1953, anti-Shah demonstrations formed part of a power struggle between the Shah and his leftist Prime Minister, Dr Mossadeq.

    But the second of two coups ended the struggle in the Shah's favour.

    His first marriage to Princess Fawzia of Egypt which ended in divorce produced a daughter but no male heir. The second, to Soraya Esfandiari, a Persian aristocrat's daughter, proved childless and ended in 1958.

    A year later the Shah married Farah Diba who gave birth to Crown Prince Reza.

    In 1967, after 26 years of rule, the Shah was officially crowned. He had himself delayed the ceremony until he felt he had placed Iran on the road to social and economic stability.

    Four years later, with all the opulence that characterised his reign, the Shah entertained hundreds of select guests at Persopolis, marking 25 centuries of monarchy in Iran. Nonetheless the Shah was only the second member of a dynasty founded by his father.

    The Shah began to build up foreign ties. He maintained cordial relations with the Soviet Union despite his anti-communist stand in Iran.

    But most of the technological expertise and military aid was provided by Western countries, many of whom, like France, rely on oil imports from Iran.

    By 1978, when the Shah visited the scene of Iran's worst earthquake which claimed the lives of 20-thousand people, martial law had been imposed in the capital and 11 other cities. Hundreds had died in anti-Shah demonstrations. Iran entered a period of instability unmatched in 25 years. By the end of the year violent riots indicated just how far discontent had extended among the country's 34-million-people.

    The Shah left Iran and the Islamic Revolution. He maintained he was on vacation but among his personal possessions in Morocco was said to be a small casket of Iranian soil.

    The United States, once a staunch ally, allowed the Shah into New York for hospital treatment. There it became clear he was seriously ill with cancer. Militant Islamic students wanted the Shah returned to Iran to face charges resulting from his former monarchy. They seized the American Embassy in teheran taking fifty of its staff hostage. The Shah and his family flew to Panama.

    The Shah spent hi last days in a hospital in Egypt as a guest of President Anwar Sadat. even after the Shah's death the future of hostages remain uncertain. As for the Shah ... he will be buried here at the Rifai mosque in Cairo, burial place of the Egyptian Royal Family.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA17RSXCBRKJORJKW89IN34IAXM
    Media URN:
    VLVA17RSXCBRKJORJKW89IN34IAXM
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    28/07/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:32:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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