• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: The Polish government has welcomed a compromise on the issue of worker self-management made by the independent trade union, Solidarity, but says it remains deeply suspicious of the union's political intentions.

  • Description

    1.
    SV Olszowski speaking in Polish
    0.24

    2.
    GV PAN Agricultural talks with Mr. Jaruzelski (MUTE)


    3.
    GVs & SVs Soviet goods arriving at rail depots (MUTE) (4 shots)
    1.08

    4.
    GVs & SV Farmers' union meeting (4 shots)
    1.42




    Initials BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: The Polish government has welcomed a compromise on the issue of worker self-management made by the independent trade union, Solidarity, but says it remains deeply suspicious of the union's political intentions. The compromise retains the right of workers to hire and fire management but gives the authorities a power of veto in which case the matter would go to an independent court. The compromise was reached by Solidarity's national executive on Tuesday night (22 September) after warnings that the Soviet Union may cut supplies of raw materials to Poland.

    SYNOPSIS: The warming was from a senior Polish politburo member, Stefan Olszowski. In a speech on Polish television he said Poland was reliant on Soviet supplies but the reverse certainly wasn't true. He spoke of the dangers of civil war and said social tensions were sweeping Poland like an avalanche.

    Meanwhile in Warsaw, the Prime Minister, Mr. Jaruzelski was having talks with a Soviet delegation led by the Kremlin's economic planning chief, Mr. Nikolai Baibakov. The delegation is in Poland for the usual autumn discussions on future trade levels between the two allies but this year the talks have a special significance.

    Poland cannot survive without the tremendous inflow of Soviet goods and raw materials. The balance of trade in Moscow's favour this year alone is more than a billion roubles (1,800 million dollars U.S.). Most important are cotton and oil without which as one government minister said this week, there would be no industrial production at all. Food production is also affected.

    These farmers meeting are concerned about the price of grain to feed their stock. Grain is in such acute shortage that the price of bread trebled last month and with a reportedly poor harvest in the Soviet Union, there is little hope of help there. With Poland's absolute reliance on Soviet aid there seems to be little doubt that if the Kremlin did threaten to stop or curtail shipments that the government in Poland would have to take stronger action to limit the activities of Solidarity.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA1318IBIDWA0W53SPOPDC9THZ2
    Media URN:
    VLVA1318IBIDWA0W53SPOPDC9THZ2
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    23/09/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:42:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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