Star Item
This video has no sound
  • Description

    Tom Walls and Mary Brough have a go at playing golf. Mary Brough is a rather stout elderly lady. Tom Walls was a popular comedian of the day.

    Tom gives Mary tips on her stroke. Mary hits the ball and then Tom and Ralph Lynn go off in search of it. Ralph finds the ball and covers it with grass but Tom finds it and accuses his friend of cheating. Mary comes clambering over a bump in the golf course. She stands on top of the bump with her golf bag over her shoulder. We then see Tom Walls standing in front of a grand house with huntsmen and hounds. Various shots of the huntsmen and of the beagles. Top shot of a country road with trees either side. Men in hunting colours ride down the road with the beagles alongside them. The hunt and dogs come towards the camera - horses jumping over a hedge. Closer view of the horses taking the jump. Various shots.

    Intertitle tells us that Stanley Wootton, Percy Alden, Cecil Langlands, W. Payne and his son (all well-known horsemen) and many other famous trainers and riders are amongst the hunt. C/U of a huntswoman speaking to a man in hunting garb. M/S two huntsmen tending to the dogs. Tom Walls (presumably) in hunting jacket, shakes hands with another man.

    Was item in Eve's Film Review issue 411.

    Note: Tom Walls and Ralph Lynn appeared together in many comedy stage plays in the 20s it seems. For example, another Eve's Film Review item feature the pair as they appear in "Thark". Perhaps they were a bit of a double act.

  • Tags

  • Data

    British Pathé
    Issue Date:
    Media URN:
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Film ID:
    Black & White
    Time in/Out:
    01:11:56:00 / 01:14:57:00
    EP 109
    Sort Number:
    EP 109
  • Appears in...

    Beagling Films
  • Stills

    0:01 0:02 0:03 0:04

Comments (1)

  1. Karl Williams says

    It's the other way around, Ralph Lynn giving Mary Brought instructions in the first scene and Tom Walls who hides the golf ball in the mud.

    The two stars did indeed appear together in many Aldwych stage farces through the 20s and 30s, a few of which were later made into feature films in the 30s including Rookery Nook, Thark, A Cuckoo in the Nest, Dirty Work and A Cup of Kindness.

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment